Brilliantprints Live Help

Posts Tagged ‘editing’

Brilliant Prints – Valentines Day Competition – Win your own canvas print

February 1st, 2008 No Comments

To celebrate Valentine’s Day we are launching our first ever competition. They will hopefully become a regular feature of our blog – so make sure you check back regularly!

The Challenge

We have just posted a tutorial that shows how to use the free photo editing program picnik to create your own Valentines Day image.

For our first ever competition we’ll be asking you to create your own Valentine’s Day image (whether you use Picnik or any other photo-editing program). The content, style and effect are all open to your interpretation (as long as you keep within our theme)

Send it to us at competitions@brilliantprints.com.au and the winning image will be printed on an 11 x 14 inch canvas and express posted to you in times for Valentine’s Day.

The Rules

  1. All images submitted must be your own work
  2. You must consent to having your image posted on this blog in the next competition post. Your images will not be used in any other way.
  3. All entries must be received by February 8th 2008 5pm AEST.
  4. The winner will be contacted by February 10th.
  5. The prize will only be shipped to an Australian address.

Please direct any questions to competitions@brilliantprints.com.au

Quick Tips – Part 1 – Remove cluttered backgrounds

January 22nd, 2008 No Comments

In the heat of the photographic moment, it can be very easy to focus only on the subject of the shot and ignore what’s happening in the background. It’s only when we download the images onto our computer, or get them developed, that we realise that we also managed to capture a whole array of distracting clutter.

In the first of our quick tips – we’ll be showing you how to achieve some retrospective simplicity with the aid of some not-so-difficult Adobe Photoshop tips. The basic principles would apply to all photo editing programs.

Step 1: Crop the background

Cropping out as much of the background as possible is a simple easy, short-cut. Just make sure that you don’t detract from some of the basic rules of composition and symmetry.

For our test picture we are going to use an image from a press conference announcing the "Crowded House" Reunion. We are going to attempt to edit the photo to focus it far more tightly on the gentlemen in the Hawaiin shirt.

 As usual, we used our marquee to make the initial selection – and then selected Edit – Crop.

Step 2: Select your subject

To blur our background – we want to use the lasoo tool from our toolbox to very roughly select around our subject. Make sure that you leave a little bit of space around his body (as per the image below)

We want to eliminate some of the extraneous space by feathering our edge. In Photoshop goto Select – Feather. The value will differ depending on the final size of our image. You want to choose a number of pixels that brings the marquee selection closer into your subject without crossing over any of their edges.

Invert your selection by going – Select – Invert.

Step 2: Blur the background

To blur our background we are going to use the Gaussian blur tool. Goto – Filter – Blur – Gaussian Blur. Choose a value that blurs the background without totally eliminating our perception of the subjects. If you have the preview button ticked you can keep trying until you get something that works perfectly. For our test image we only needed to use a very small value.

If you were a little bit messy, you may need to touch up the blurred background manually.

Use the blur tool from your tool-box, choose a small brush size and touch up any edges around the body of the subject that were not blurred by your initial pass. If you treat it like a standard paint-brush, the task should not be too difficult.

 Step 4: Saturate/Desaturate

In the final stage we want to desaturate the background slightly to further increase the emphasis on the main subject. Select your sponge tool and set it to desaturate 15%, then brush over the majority of the background.

 After desaturating the background, change the sponge tool to saturate and set it at a smaller value (7-8%) Paint over the subject to slightly bring out the colour.

The final effect should be subtle – but should help the subject of your image – just pop a little out of the background.

You can see our attempt below and compare it to the original image. There are other methods that may produce more effective results – but the advantage of this method is that it’s fast, effective and easy!

 

Picnik Photo Editing – Part 4 – Using the edit tools

January 18th, 2008 2 Comments

The edit screen of the Picnik photo editing system gives you access to some of the standard features available in most editing programs (like black and white) However, options such as the ‘effects’ brush allow you to apply them in subtle and sometimes surprising ways.

The Edit Screen

An expanded version of the edit screen can be seen below:

Not all the features available in the edit screen are accessible to free members (many of them are premium customers only). However the following features can be accessed by everyone:

  1. Snow: Applies white snow-like particles across the image. The size and intensity of the particles can be adjusted with the fade button
  2. Black and White: Convert an image (or image part) into black and white
  3. Sepia: Applies sepia tones across the image
  4. Boost: Increases the saturation of colours in the image
  5. Soften: Softens the edges of the image
  6. Vignette: Feathers the borders (making them fade from solid to misty) and applies a back background
  7. Matte:  Feathers the borders without changing the border

Using the edit tools

If you click on an option on the left hand side of the edit screen you’ll see a screen similar to the picture below:

If we look at the labels:

1. Fades the effect. A value of 100% means that no change will apply to your image. A value of 0 % means that the effect will be applied at maximum

2. Clicking on the brush tool opens a second menu screen (as per below)

The brush tool allows you to remove the effect from a certain portion of the image. For instance – you can make a single colour item while the rest stays black and white.

Looking at the labelled section of the picture above:

1. Changes the effect of our brush. If we select original – the effect will be applied to the image when we use our brush (i.e. the painted section will become black and white.) If we select effect, our paint brush will remove the effect.

2. Alters the size of the brush. For painting large areas of an image use a larger brush, for fine work drop this right down.

3. Reverses the effect of the brush. For instance – with the black and white tool – it turns the black and white area back into colour.

Putting it into effect

Our test image can be seen below. We wanted to turn everything but the flower into black and white:

1. We clicked on the b/w palette – clicked on the brush icon and selected a large brush. We checked that we had selected ‘original’  in the brush palette. We roughly went over the flower (returning colour to the petals and leaves)

2. We then selected a much smaller brush and changed our selection from ‘original’ to ‘effect’. By painting around the edges of the fingers – we were now turning the coloured portions back into black and white.

As you can see, two minutes work with the black and white tool helped us create a stunning mixed colour shot!

Tomorrow: Our final Picnik masterclass

Make sure you check out the other parts of our Picnik tutorial series:

 

  • An introduction to Picnik
  • Absolute Beginners Guide to Picnik
  • Preparing your picture with Picnik
  • Picnik Advanced: Using the Exposure tools for tonal control

     

     

     

  • Picnik Photo Editing – Part 3 – Levels, Histograms and much more!

    January 17th, 2008 3 Comments

    While the Picnik photo editing software contains an array of easy-to-use tools for the casual photo editor, it also gives you access to a small selection of more powerful options. In Part 3 of this tutorial we will examine the levels tool in greater depth, providing some pictorial ‘before and after shots’ as illustration.

    Exposure Tools

    High-powered software like Adobe Photoshop have long given photographers the ability to finely tune the exposure of problematic photos. Picnik gives users the ability to replicate this function (albeit not completely) through the Exposure tool.

    From the main editing screen you simply click on:

    1) Edit

    2) Exposure

    3) Advanced

    and you will see the following screen:

    The Histogram in the picture shows the tonal range of your image. The left hand side graph represents the proportion of pixels in your image that are absolute black, while the right-hand side shows the proportion of pixels that are absolute white. Unless you are aiming for a particular artistic effect, the graph should be concentrated in the middle. 

     In looking at the above graph we can see that it shows that our source image will be very dark (as can be seen below in the picture)

    The advanced exposure menu gives us three ways of correcting this image.

    The Brightness button allows us to lower or decrease the overall brightness of the image. You can see how this effects our test image:

    When we darken the image by pushing the brightness button to the left hand side you can see that the tonal range of our image is concentrated around a narrow spectrum of absolute black – creating a very murky effect.

    In contrast, when we push the image towards the absolute white end – we end up with a picture lacking contrast and tonal depth.

    The brightness tool can be effective with an image that is only slightly – out of balance – however we would recommend taking a look at the highlight and shadows tool for more nuanced editing.

    The Highlights slider menu allows you to individually manipulate the white point of the image. You can see from the below image that it has increased the intensity of the existing white points (the faces) without really touching the surrounding shadows.

     

     

    The Shadows slider does the opposite – increasing the intensity of the black points while minimising the impact on the white points.

    You should also be able to see how changing each of the sliders impacts on the histogram for each image.

    Pulling it all together

    The easiest way to learn how to use the exposure tools is to practice! Try playing around with each slider, also looking at the affect in combination. It’s very hard to make a mistake (as you can always reset your values and start again)

    Our final copy of the our test image can be seen below:

    Tomorrow: Retouching faces and teeth using Picnik.

    Take a look at the other parts of the Picnik series:

    Picnik Photo-editing Tutorial – Part 1 – Beginner’s Guide

    January 15th, 2008 5 Comments

    For those confident with web-based software you can skip ahead by signing up here.

    Otherwise – the following information will help even an absolute beginner sign up to and start using Picnik.

     

    Requirements

     

    You will need to have Adobe Flash 9 installed on your system for the service to work. If you don’t have it – it will prompt you to download.

     

    Sign-up

     

    1. Go to this page.
    2. Click register
    3. You only need to provide a user-name, email address and password (see picture below). Untick the box at the bottom of the screen if you don’t want to receive email updates.
     

     

    1. That’s it. You don’t even need to activate your account. You will be taken straight to your personal homepage and can start editing images straight away.
     

    Uploading your first image

     

    To get started on editing your first image:

     

    1. Click on the upload now button (see picture below)
     

    Picnik Welcome Screen

     

    1. A window will open showing files on your hard-drive. Choose the required file and click upload. Once the file is uploaded your are ready to go!
    The Picnik menu system

     

    The attached picture shows the range of different options available for your photograph:

     

     

     

     

    The options available are as follows:

     

    Home: Takes you back to the initial start screen

    Photos: Allows you to upload new photos or grab them from other web services

    Edit: Offers a range of basic tools such as cropping, exposure, colours and red-eye reduction

    Create: Offers a range of very cool filters allowing you to modify your image (b/w, sepia etc)

    Save and Share: Allows you to save your image back on your hard drive, and share it through a range of other web applications.

     

    Tomorrow: Editing  your first image

     

    Take a look at the other parts of the Picnik series:

     

  • Absolute Beginners Guide to Picnik
  • Preparing your picture with Picnik
  • Picnik Advanced: Using the Exposure tools for tonal control
  • Using the Picnik brush tools for editing
  • Create your own valentines image with Picnik
  •  

     

    Free software to give your digital photographs the *wow* factor

    January 15th, 2008 6 Comments

    2007 was the year of the web application – with popular desktop software such as calendars, word-processing and project management software moving online. It also saw the debut of a range of free feature-rich, intuitive photo editing programs that can be accessed entirely online.

     In the next few weeks we’ll showcase four programs, covering software suitable for both amateur photographers and professionals alike.

     

    This week we will focus on a new program called Picnik.

     

     

    What do other people say?

    • PCWorld says it’s: “Outstanding online photo editing for casual photographers who live online”
    • Tech Journalist Walt Mossberg (Wall Street Journal) is a strong advocate. He says “If you want to see how good a Web application can be, take Picnik for a spin”
    The Good Points

    • Recently, Yahoo updated popular photo storage service flickr to include one click access to picnik editing tools. Integrating the two has helped make a great set of programs even better. Picnik is working on integrations with other web programs such as Picasa and Facebook.
    • Picnik is accessible from anywhere you have internet access. It helps eliminate the frustrations of being on the wrong computer and wanting to edit your photos.
    The Bad Points

    • The picnik editing tools are fantastic, but they don’t give you the same control as dedicated desktop programs. If you want to move beyond basic colour correction and adjustment – this program will not be for you.
    • Picnik offers a smooth experience if you use it from a broadband connection. However, if you try to access it from a dial-up internet connection you’ll discover just how frustrating it can be!
    © 2020 Brilliant Prints

    Are you a professional photographer or reseller?

     

    Our Brilliant Prints professional site has 8 great products, useful resources and wholesale pricing.  ABN required.